Gallery

Why History Matters: Consigning Items With A Story

28 Dec

Do you have an interesting coin, bank note, or shipwreck artifact with a history to tell? Here are the 15 reasons why you should consign to us now to be a part of Treasure Auction 21:

1) Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC will get top dollar for your consignments. As the world’s ONLY full time auction specialists in Spanish colonial and shipwreck coins (not to mention ingots and artifacts), we have exclusive clientele worldwide and extensive knowledge and experience. That translates into results you can bank on.

2)     Our personal service is unparalleled. Our bidders and consignors deal directly with the heads of our company, who also personally research and photograph everything. Our aim is maximum comfort and confidence, so we accommodate everyone’s needs through barrier-free communication. No consignor or bidder is too big or too small for our attention!

3)     Our overall philosophy is that specialized attention beats massive volume and market sprawl. Lima Gold Cobs 1715 Fleet Lima, Peru, cobs choice set: 8 escudos 1712M, 4 escudos 1710M, Within our specialty we handle the same important collectors worldwide as other companies but with much more personal service and far less overhead. We make sure that every important consignment gets maximum exposure at shows and on the Internet without wasting resources on exclusive venues and over-distribution.

4)     While other auction houses simply put the lots up for sale and depend on the market to set the prices, we take the steps to personally point out lots to the right bidders, and we maximize exposure to all bidders via mail-out catalogs and the Web. We don’t just hold an auction, we make an event of it!

5)    ¡Hablamos su idioma! Our staff deals with the most important Latin American bidders and buyers on the market. We are able to travel and talk to all our Hispanic bidders and consignors, which creates a level of comfort that draws even the most cautious participants to our venue.

6)     Our financial record is unblemished. In over 8 years of auctions, we have never paid a consignor late (unless he requested it) or had any dispute that was not corrected immediately. We give winning bidders all available options for payment and take necessary steps to make sure all bills are paid.

7)     Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC offers cash advances for qualified consignments. Many consignors also enjoy being able to trade their proceeds against purchases within the same sale. Our personalized attention makes it possible to accommodate many special needs.

8)     We are not just auctioneers: We are recognized researchers and editors, with many scholarly books and articles to our credit. (We also give seminars and teach classes when we can) With every auction we make new numismatic discoveries and publish them immediately for everyone’s benefit. It takes more than just a reference number to sell a rare coin!

9)    Because not every consignment comes in sale-ready, we take the time to properly merchandise each item and even offer limited conservation services. Our goal is to make each lot the best it can be so the consignor will benefit.

10)     Our presentations are the best in the business. We start with detailed lot descriptions, disclosing all aspects positive and negative, to give bidders the peace of mind to comfortably place their bids and avoid returns. For cobs especially, grading and evaluation are very difficult and require our exclusive expertise. After rigorous proofreading and editing, we marry the text with state-of-the-art digital photography and zooming for important details. Then, with keen attention to efficient and aesthetically pleasing layout, we put it all online and in beautiful catalogs that are collectible in their own right and housed as references in many important numismatic libraries like the American Numismatic Association and the Numismatic Literary Guild. Finally, our catalogs and results are permanently accessible for all to see on our own website, on iCollector.com and on CoinArchives.com.

11)  We make a point to estimate all lots at reasonable levels. We research all consignments to make sure the lots are being offered at correct levels. We never take advantage of a consignor’s ignorance of the current market or rarity of his material, and we take any advice or follow any special instructions the consignor may have.

12)   From the minute you consign, Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC will get the word out to potential bidders. We get excited about unique and rare pieces and we pass that enthusiasm on to our clients.

13)  Our preeminence in the field of Spanish colonial and treasure coins has logically propelled us to the top of the field in Latin American numismatics as well. Our expertise and clientele are now among the best for this often-underrated field. We are also developing a presence in world coins in general, especially gold, with ancient coins, medals and paper money in nearly every auction as well. Nothing is outside our radar!

14)  Through iCollector.com and our own expertise we are able to conduct our auctions using the latest technology and convenience of online bidding, without over-the-top bells and whistles that just become confusing. The iCollector platform brings hundreds of thousands of bidders worldwide to our auctions with the confidence of unparalleled tech support and absolute third-party confidentially. Simply put, it is old-style service with state-of-the-art technology.

15)  We are members in good standing with most major professional guilds and collector organizations, including: IAPN (International Association of Professional Numismatists), ANA (American Numismatic Association), ANE (Asociación Numismática Española), FUN (Florida United Numismatists), NLG (Numismatic Literary Guild), NI (Numismatics International), USMexNA (U.S. Mexican Numismatic Association), PCGS(Professional Coin Grading Service) and NGC (Numismatic Guaranty Corporation). We are fully insured (underwritten by Lloyds of London) and fully licensed with the State of Florida as auctioneers (AU3635) and as an auction business (AB2592).

treasure bars atocha 1715 fleet gold and silver ingots pirate

NOTE: Consignment deadline for our May 3-4, 2017 Auction

February 19, 2017

Come and see us in person to the following upcoming shows:

Florida United Numismatists Show (accepting consignments)
January 5-8, 2017
Fort Lauderdale, FL

New York International Show NYINC (accepting consignments)
January 12-15, 2017
New York, NY

Vero Beach Coin Show (accepting consignments)
January 14-15, 2017
Vero Beach, FL

Long Beach Coin Expo  (accepting consignments)
February 16-18, 2017
Long Beach, CA

ANA’s National Money Show  (Lot viewing)
March 9-11, 2017
Orlando, FL

Please contact us at office@sedwickcoins.com or call 407.975.3325

We are constantly looking for:

  • High-grade gold and silver Latin American coins (especially large collections)

  • World Gold coins including US and early British and Dutch

  • Rare early Spanish colonial cobs (collections or single coins)

  • 1715-Fleet gold and silver dated cobs.

  • Shipwreck coins and cobs in reasonable condition with original certificates

  • High-grade silver cobs & pillar dollars

  • Artifacts from shipwrecks (well documented and properly conserved)

  • Silver and gold ingots from shipwrecks

  • World Paper Money

  • U.S. Coins

Image may contain: 1 person

Advertisements
Gallery

Sedwick Treasure Auction Wrap-Up, Tips for Buying Cobs, and Where to Find Us

8 Dec

sedwickbar

I’m finally able to take a breather from post-auction duties of packing and shipping to share some thoughts with you. First, all of us at Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC want to thank our bidders, consignors, auction speakers, and auction attendees for helping make Treasure Auction #20 one of our best auctions to date. Without YOU, auctions don’t happen. We are grateful for the personal and professional relationships we have nurtured over the years and look forward to many more.

As the Christmas buying season kicks into high gear, there are a few reminders to help you get the most for your money, at least when it comes to buying coins. When you buy a widget, you go to a store that you know sells them. For example, I buy electronics at a place like Best Buy. When you buy a coin, particularly a niche coin like a cob, you need to find a specialty seller, someone who knows what he’s doing.

fake-mexican-cob
Can You Tell This is a Counterfeit?

If you don’t, you may buy a fake instead of the real thing. Or, you may buy something less than what it should be for the price because the seller doesn’t really know his product. Either way, you won’t be satisfied with your purchase. Again, always buy from reputable dealers whether you’re buying a shipwreck coin or a dryer.

Next, whether it’s a cob or a car, buy what you like. This is especially true for any commodity that you might consider an “investment” because most things appreciate only after you’ve held onto them for a good period of time. Quick profits don’t happen very often, so plan to enjoy your purchase for years. When you do sell, you’ll be well rewarded.

Finally, buy the best you can afford if you really want to be happy with your purchase. Buyer’s remorse from letting the coin you really wanted get away from you stays with you for a long time. If you’re building a collection, it’s much easier to buy great quality at the beginning than spend time and effort to upgrade later. That said, if what you can afford isn’t the best quality, don’t worry. You’ll be happy to simply own the piece in the first place.

We can help you build the collection of your dreams. Just ask us! And, you can visit us in person at the following 2017 shows where we will have a table:

schelude2017show2Happy Holidays to all and we look forward to seeing you in the New Year.

Gallery

What You Can’t Live Without in Treasure Auction #20 (part four)

8 Nov

We’re into the home stretch with only 4 days to go until the auction! We hope you have been bidding and will join us for the live portion.

Below are some of the most important artifacts in the auction, and while most of these items will come up at the end of the auction, it’s definitely a case of “last but not least.” Coins–as well as all shipwreck treasure–are our business, and you can be confident that we know what we’re talking about in our descriptions.

lot-473-ta-20

Lot 473, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

Why have one coin when you can have several? The above is a large clump of 20+ Mexican cob 8 reales, two in front dated 1714. It’s a very impressive display that stands up well, also a very rare item these days and was recovered from the Spanish 1715 Fleet off the east coast of Florida.

 

lot-1086-ta-20

Lot 1636, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

You could eat off the above plate today because it’s in such good condition. It’s marked with a tax stamp and LDo.IVo. / RAMYREZ under rim. More important, the underside of the rim bears most of a castles-and-lions circular tax stamp and a stamping in tiny letters that exactly matches lots 41-43 of the Christie’s 1988 Atocha auction, in which that mark was described as an “owner’s stamp.” It is clearly part of a set with this bigger basin; those three lots were only 8-7/8″ in diameter and described as “dinner plates.” They fetched some of the highest prices realized among the silver plates in that sale, upwards of $6000 hammer, but not even close to the price realized for the only large basin (like what we are offering here but slightly bigger), lot 47, which hammered at $22,000!

 

lot-1646-ta-20

Lot 1642, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is a complete gold plain-loop chain, 34.55 grams, from the “Tricentennial Treasure” find of 2015. There are hundreds of tiny plain links in a tight chain (easily kinked) that is remarkable for being unbroken and complete, eminently wearable and attractive despite its simplicity, also one of the first artifacts from the famous “Tricentennial Treasure” to be offered for sale. From the 1715 Fleet (Douglass Beach site).

 

lot-1654-ta-20

Lot 1654, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

What’s an auction with out a cannon? The above Danish naval “4-pounder” bronze howitzer from the late 1700s  is  believed to have been from military and naval stores captured by the British during the Battle of Copenhagen in 1807. Sent to England, these items were used by English forces during the Napoleonic Wars and in America and Canada during the War of 1812. Some ended up in American service due to capture or purchase. The bronze barrel has a chambered bore (which most howitzers have), a designated area for the powder charge, turned decorations and cast with bronze pointing tiller cascabel ending on a rounded ball end. This cannon was made for use as a swivel gun but is now mounted on a mahogany naval deck carriage (complete and serviceable with working elevation screw and wheels) with correct brass and iron mounts and four wheels from the early 19th century (possibly exact replacements made later). The barrel is in excellent condition with minor surface wear and excellent light-brown patina.

Once again, we hope you all your bids are winning bids!

Gallery

What You Can’t Live Without in Treasure Auction #20 (part three)

2 Nov

Today we want to make you aware of some very important silver coins you can bid on in our upcoming Sedwick Treasure, World, U.S. Coin & Paper Money Auction #20. When you see descriptions containing words or phrases like “unique,” “very rare,” “finest known,” and “unlimited value,” you can be sure these items will bring top dollar…and be worth every penny. It bears repeating that we often say you should buy the “best” coins  you can afford, whether that means coins in the best condition or of the highest rarity. The good things in life don’t come cheaply but you’ll rarely regret your decision to buy them and enjoy them for years. Good luck in our auction!

lot-561-ta-20

Lot 561, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is a Mexico City, Mexico, 4 reales, Charles-Joanna, “Early Series,” coin and those who collect them know that varieties with the assayer mark (P) to the left and mintmark (M) to the right are generally much rarer than others. Also, this is an early variety in Assayer P’s tenure with the use of HISPANIE instead of the later use of HISPANIARVM in the legend on the pillars side.

 

lot-664-ta-20

Lot 664, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is an extremely rare Mexico City, Mexico, cob 1 real Royal, 1643/2P. It is probably unique, but certainly unique in quality and of almost unlimited in value to the specialist collector.

lot-777-ta-20

Lot 777, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is a rare Potosi, Bolivia, cob 8 reales, 1634T and the first coin collected by Emilio Paoletti, (and ex-Burzio, ex-Martini, ex-Janson) with copy #1 of Paoletti’s book 8 Reales Cobs of Potosi (3rd ed., 2016) and signed by him on the first page where the number 001 appears. What a remarkable pedigree!

lot-857-ta-20

Lot 857, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is a rare Potosi, Bolivia, cob 8 reales, 1652E transitional Type III from the Capitana (1654). What is interesting about this die variety is that the O-E above 52 to right of shield is punched over N-8.

lot-961-ta-20

Lot 961, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is a rare Potosi, Bolivia, cob 8 reales Royal, 1714Y with an interesting four-digit date below cross (the standard for 1712-15).

lot-967-ta-20

Lot 967, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is a very rare Potosi, Bolivia, cob 8 reales Royal, 1725Y, Louis I, ordinal PRIMERO. Royals of Louis I are among the most desirable and difficult to obtain, particularly since the general coins of this period are so crude. The present example is very bold, with full inner details and nearly full legends, including full LVIS PRIMERO (not just PR) and POTOSI (the pillars side slightly off-center).

lot-1027-ta-20

Lot 1027, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is an extremely rare and currently unique Potosi, Bolivia, cob 4 reales, 1732YA. This is a very important 4R, as it is the ONLY date and assayer (not counting overdates) that we have NEVER seen in our 25-year study of Potosi pillars-and-waves cobs.

lot-1079-ta-20

Lot 1079, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is an extremely rare Potosi, Bolivia, cob 1 real Heart, 1718Y. It’s an attractive example of the classic Heart shape and like most Heart minors, this specimen is probably unique.

lot-1086-ta-20

Lot 1086, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is a Bogota, Colombia, cob 8 reales, 1670, assayer PoRS. It’s the finest and only known specimen in NGC census (NGC certification #4348135001) and is certainly among the choicest Bogota pillars-and-waves cobs in existence, in fact the highest of all Bogota cob 8R at NGC by two grades.

lot-1338-ta-20

Lot 1338, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is a very rare Nicaragua (Leon), provisional “imitation cob” 2 reales, 1823 P.M.P.Y. It is probably the finest known of this Leon type with “pine tree” tops of pillars, a type rarely seen without a hole or significant damage. See Carlos Jara’s book Central American Provisional and Provincial Mints (2007) for more information about the attribution of this type to Leon.

We hope you find exactly what you’re looking for in our upcoming auction and please feel free to contact us with any questions you might have. You can see coin lots in person this weekend (and see Dan, Augi, and Connor) at the Whitman Expo at the Baltimore Convention Center November 3-6.

Gallery

A relative to the Confederate half dollar? 6 U.S. highlights in Treasure Auction 20

28 Oct

While Spanish colonial and shipwreck coins make up much of our November auction, a number of other collecting areas are well represented. We’ve already taken a look at paper money, so let’s turn to U.S. rarities coming up for auction.

Lot 1401 – 1890-CC Coronet Head double eagle – Est. $2,000 – 3,000

25873517_1

As the highest denomination struck by the famous Carson City Mint, their double eagles were never struck in great numbers. Mintages barely topped 100,000 between 1874 and 1876. By the time this 1890-CC double eagle was struck, the mint had only three years left before closing in 1893. Still, the fact that 91,209 were minted in 1890 is impressive and makes this example an in-demand, yet affordable piece for the Carson City type set collector.

Lot 1414 – 1844-D Coronet Head double eagle – Est. $1,500 – 2,250

25873530_1

dahlonega-mint-1877

The former Dahlonega Mint building in 1877 or 1878.

This 1844-D half eagle was struck in the better years of the Dahlonega Mint, where mintages of the half eagle approached 100,000 coins from 1843 to 1845. In 1844, 88,982 Dahlonega half eagles were made, making it, like the above lot, attractive yet affordable for the Dahlonega type collector or for someone who just wants to own one. The typical bag marks and scratches are noted in the fields, with wear evident yet not enough to knock it down to Very Fine as the coin still has a full Liberty headband.

Lot 1429 – 1914 Indian Head quarter eagle – Est. $1,500 – 2,250

25873545_1

Some rarities take the form of gorgeous, high grade examples, such as this 1914 quarter eagle. NGC certified it as MS-63, putting it ahead of many others in uncirculated grades. Only light bagmarks are noted in the fields with some planchet adjustment lines in the headdress and light toning throughout.

Lot 1436 – 1846 Seated Liberty silver dollar – Est. $900 – 1,350

25873552_1.jpg

This AU-55 1846 Seated Liberty dollar is perfect for a U.S. type set collector. Only light even wear is visible on the high points. The fields and some areas of the design are darkly toned with lighter toning around the stars, dress folds, and eagle’s wings. Overall, a nice, lightly circulated example with a well-centered strike.

Lot 1437 – Set of three New Orleans-minted half dollars from the SS Republic – Est. $1,500 – 2,250

25873553_1

This set represents two important events to U.S. coin collectors: the beginning of the Civil War in 1861 and the sinking of the SS Republic in 1865.

Upon the election of Abraham Lincoln on Nov. 6, 1860, Southern states began to secede, with Louisiana seceding Jan. 26, 1861 before joining the Confederate States of America on March 21, 1861. It was during that time the New Orleans Mint continued striking Seated Liberty half dollars under all three governments: U.S., State of Louisiana, and Confederate. Through die diagnostics, all three issues can be identified, while in this set, the U.S. issue is denoted with an 1860-O half dollar.  The 1861-O Confederate issued half dollar in the set, noted for the die crack on the obverse above Liberty’s face, shares the same obverse die as the four known Confederate half dollars bearing the words “Confederate States of America” above the eagle on the reverse.

Furthermore, all three coins were recovered from the SS Republic, a ship that sank with many U.S. coins onboard, both silver and gold, on Oct. 25, 1865. Since the wreck’s discovery in 2003, some U.S., State of Louisiana, and Confederate issued Seated Liberty half dollars have been found and packaged into attractive sets like this, where coin collectors, Civil War historians and shipwreck researchers can appreciate these historical coins.

Lot 1439 – 1909-S Indian Head cent – Est. $700 – 1,000

25873555_1

This is a beautiful 1909-S cent, a rare, key and final date to the long-lived (1859-1909) Indian Head cent series. Certified by NGC as AU-58 Brown, this piece has lovely chocolate brown toning throughout with choice wood-grain toning on the obverse and only light wear on the high parts of the design.

For more U.S. coins appearing in our November auction, visit the Session Four page here, up for sale on Sunday, Nov. 13 and Session Five (internet-only) page here, hammering on Monday, Nov. 14.

Gallery

What You Can’t Live Without Buying in Treasure Auction #20 (part two)

25 Oct

In this blog, we will cover some of the big-ticket items (i.e. gold and gold and silver bars) you can find in our upcoming auction. These coins and bars are important for either their rarity, their quality, their provenance or all of the above. They are for the discerning advanced collector who can afford the best. These lots also represent historical treasures which anyone can appreciate whether they can buy them or not.

 

 

lot-30-ta-20

Lot 30, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above Lima 8 escudos cob is the finest known of its type in the NGC census with a grade of MS 63. Dan has described it as “a superb specimen all around, befitting the top honors.” Over and above that, it’s from the 1715 Fleet!

 

 

lot-35-ta-20

Lot 35, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

Another Lima 8 escudos cob, this coin is tied for finest known in the NGC census with a grade of MS 62. Dan’s description: “Clearly top grade but probably also the best in terms of strike, and apparently one of very few of this date and denomination recovered” from the Luz. ‘Nuff said!

 

 

lot-48-ta-20

Lot 48, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

A Bogota 8 escudos cob, this coin is the finest and only specimen in the NGC census with a grade of XF 45. Per Dan’s description it’s a “royal-like specimen on a broad flan with 100% full and bold date and king’s name in legend….one of just a handful of full-date specimens from this mint that seem to have been intended as presentation pieces, so great is the contrast between them and the regular issues with only partially or non-visible dates.” Furthermore, he notes that “this Philip V issue is much tougher than the Ferdinand VI type that followed.”

 

lot-89-ta-20

Lot 89, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

This Potosi bust 4 escudos is the finest and only known in the NGC census with a grade of AU 58. As Dan has noted, only 170 pieces (both laureate and non-laureate types) were minted and this date is the rarest bust-type issue in any denomination from this mint. It’s “a trophy gem and has no equal in any sales records known to us,” with “trophy” seeming like an understatement!

 

lot-161-ta-20

Lot 161, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is a Lima, Peru, bust 8 escudos from the time of Ferdinand VI and dated 1751. This lot is “one of only two of this ‘large wigged bust’ type” from the Luz shipwreck. Pretty rare stuff!

 

 

lot-202-ta-20

Lot 202, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

On to bars! Above is a complete gold “strap” ingot for making oro corriente pieces, marked five times with circular tax stamp of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor (Charles I of Spain) from an unidentified early 1500s wreck in the Caribbean. As Dan states, “its near-uniform flatness and its markings all indicate that this piece is the first example ever recorded of a complete ‘strap’ (in Spanish: riel) for cutting into the known (but very rare) money pieces (small) known as ‘oro corriente,’ which were used in place of actual gold coins (which were in short supply) in the colonies and thus represent the ‘first fish out of the lake’ from the colonies in terms of local gold coinage.” It dates to the 1520s and hence is “unique in importance, especially as the earliest form of Spanish colonial gold treasure we have ever offered.”

 

 

lot-203-ta-20

Lot 203, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

Another important bar, the above gold “finger” bar is encrusted with coral as from the “Golden Fleece wreck” and was made “in a period when gold coins were not yet made in the New World and ‘oro corriente’ was being phased out” says Dan. Shipwreck bars are always in demand in our auctions.

 

 

lot-210-ta-20

Lot 210, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

A very unusual silver “tumbaga” bar (#M-61) whose “most intriguing aspect is a large area of exposed pure copper, revealing how most ‘tumbaga’ silver was created by hammering silver and copper together and therefore showing the true nature of ‘metal of Michoacan’,” according to Dan. You should read The Tumbaga Saga by Agustin Garcia Barneche to learn more about these important and fascinating early silver bars.

 

 

lot-211-ta-20

Lot 211, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

What’s an auction without a large silver Atocha bar (#451)? As Dan notes of special importance, accompanying this bar is a “complete manifest report, which was an optional (and mostly declined) item when the bars were first distributed.” Rarity and provenance!

That’s all for now, and we hope this note will whet your appetite for our auction.

Gallery

What You Can’t Live Without Buying in Treasure Auction #20 (part one)

21 Oct

Our upcoming Sedwick Treasure, World, U.S. and Paper Money Auction #20 has something for everyone, and I’ll outline some highlights in upcoming blogs. First off, let’s show off our paper money section, a collectible that we haven’t been able to offer in great amounts but should become a staple of future auctions thanks to the hard work and expertise of our new employee, Connor Falk.

Lot 1522, TA #20, November 2016

At first glance, this colorful 1996 Cayman Islands 10 dollar note is appealing for the beach scene on the reverse, an open treasure chest residing beneath a palm tree as a sailboat moves in the shallow waters. But there’s an interesting backstory on this note: it shouldn’t exist. The X/1 series of notes were test notes printed by De La Rue on experimental paper, analyzed and then destroyed. A small number escaped, making them among the rarest of Cayman Islands notes. Add the fact that PMG certified this note as Gem Uncirculated 65 EPQ and this lot is an impressive rarity sure to be the cornerstone of a Caribbean paper money collection.

Lot 1535, TA #20, November 2016

This 1889 100 pesos Colombian Bond is very rare with only four or five known and is the plate note featured in Compendio Historico del Papel Moneda en Colombia by Danilo Parra Ariza. It features a light blue underprint and a well-executed design including a vignette of a man with a burro cart. Other examples are known to have cancellation marks including punch holes and rhombus-shaped cuts, making this lot all the more attractive for its lack of major marks or cuts.

Lot 1536, TA #20, November 2016

This the 1889 10 pesos, similar in design as the lot above yet featuring a popular vignette of a dog.

Lot 1560 (obverse), TA #20, November 2016

Lot 1560 (reverse), TA #20, November 2016

A very scarce and popular note with a central vignette of a Carib Indian, also featured on other Guadeloupe banknotes and coins. The Caribs called Guadeloupe “Karukera” which translates to “island with beautiful waters.” Connecting with Guadeloupe’s maritime past, the reverse features a large compass rose. There are some folds and soiling, but the numerous and heavy folds that plague large notes like this one are not here, hence why PCGS certified this note as Very Fine 30.

Lot 1578 (reverse), TA #20, November 2016

Lot 1579 (obverse), TA #20, November 2016

These two Mexican notes are extremely popular and in demand due to the beautiful tri-color reverses honoring the colors of the Mexican flag. Printed to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Mexican War of Independence, they are also the first commemorative banknotes in the world. Examples are scarce with notes in VF and higher rare while collectors give special attention to those with bright colors.
Check out Session 4 lots 1500-1623 for all of our bank note offerings.
Gallery

Some of Our Favorite Things in Upcoming Treasure Auction #20

14 Oct

As you peruse our catalog online, you might enjoy some of the items that stand out to us. Not all are big ticket items. Some are just cool because of what they represent. What items in our auction catch your attention?

lot-17-ta-20-gold-cob-earrrings-1715-fleet

Lot 17, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

lot-24-ta-20-gold-cob-pendant-1715-fleet

Lot 24, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

If bling is your thing, then these gold-coin earrings (Lot 17) and pendant (Lot 24) are a must-have! We don’t usually have earrings in our auctions, much less a pair of one escudo cobs from the 1715 Fleet. And what would complement them? Why an 8 escudos cob pendant from the 1715 Fleet! It’s really not overkill if you like to strut your stuff.

lot-210-ta-20-tumbaga-bar

Lot 210 Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

This “tumbaga” silver bar (Lot 210) is one of the coolest bars we’ve ever handled. It’s a typical rectangular bar without the depth, i.e., it’s almost like a slice of “tumbaga” (even though it’s a full bar). More interesting is the large area of exposed copper. The photo says it all. If you’ve been wanting a “tumbaga” bar, then this should be on your want list. Be sure to buy a copy of Augi’s book, The “Tumbaga” Saga, Treasure of the Conquistadors, to go with.

 

lot-777-ta-20-paoletti-first-coin

Lot 777, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

Provenance and pedigree are terms that are thrown around a lot when dealing with antiquities. We love to know where things come from, whether from a shipwreck or a particularly important collector. We have that in spades with this auction lot: It’s the first coin collected by Emilio Paoletti (Lot 777). If you don’t already know his name, then this isn’t the coin for you, but if you do, then bookmark this lot and bid!

 

lot-1569-ta-20-bank-note

Lot 1569, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

Connor, our new employee and banknote guy, praises this note (Lot 1569) as a “fascinating combination of Mexican iconography (the eagle) and Texan images (the frontiersman).” It’s an unsigned remainder from a bank chartered to operate in Columbia, Texas by the Mexican government on April 30, 1835, just a few months before the start of the Texas Revolution. During the revolution, the bank was instrumental in arranging loans and fundraising for the revolutionaries.

 

lot-1625-ta-20-engraving

Lot 1625, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

While I’m not a fan favorite of this engraving (Lot 1625), the rest of the office loves it. It’s a German copperplate engraving showing native Americans dismembering and eating Spaniards, including pouring molten gold into one poor Spaniard’s mouth. I know the Indians weren’t exactly saints, but in the larger picture, they were almost always on the losing end of run-ins with Spaniards, and this is one of the few times they came out ahead. Go Native Americans!

lot-1626-ta-20-philip-ii-engraving

Lot 1626, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

Part of this engraving (Lot 1626) graces the front cover of our catalog. It’s a hand-colored British copperplate engraving of Philip II. He’s surrounded by crests of the many countries where he was king. Yertle the Turtle (a Dr. Seuss character for those of you who didn’t grow up reading his books) had nothing on him.

 

lot-1661-ta-20-sin-razon-sword

Lot 1661, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

If I owned a sword, this is the one (Lot 1661) I would want to own because it expressly tells me when it’s OK to use it: “no me saque sin razon,” which translates to Don’t Use Me Unless You Really Need to. Maybe our modern guns should have the same inscription.

We hope you enjoy all our auction offerings and find something that truly speaks to you!

Gallery

Notes from the 2016 U.S. Mexican Numismatic Association Convention in Scottsdale, Arizona

12 Oct

hurricane-imageLast week Dan, Connor Falk (our new employee) and I traveled to Arizona ahead of Hurricane Matthew to show auction lots for our upcoming Auction #20 (more to follow on that tomorrow!) and give some presentations. We were a little unsure about leaving with a potentially dangerous storm bearing down on us, but when the going gets tough, the tough leave town. As it turned out, Matthew took an eastward jog and spared most of the central Florida area.

The U.S. Mexican Numismatic Association convention in Scottsdale is always a great time to reconnect with friends and colleagues. Connor and I got to meet Don and Lois Bailey, Mexican numismatic legends. All three of us enjoyed spending time with Ute Wartenberg Kagan, the longtime executive director of the American Numismatic Society who brought

connor-falk-with-don-bailey-at-us-mex-2016

Connor Falk with Don Bailey

important Mexican coins from the vast collection at the Society. She will also attend our Auction #20, so if you’re attending it as well, you’ll want to meet and talk with her.

cori-downing-and-ute-wartenberg-kagan-us-mex-2016

Ute Wartenberg Kagan and Cori Downing

Augi, who stayed in Florida to make sure the hurricane didn’t blow away our office, won an award at the convention for his well-received book, The “Tumbaga” Saga, Treasure of the ConquistadorsWe’re fortunate to have a very cool “Tumbaga” bar (Lot 210) in the Auction. Dan took an award for his participation in the Counterfeit Forum last year and did so again this year. The presentation was extremely well received. I spoke on the Charles and Joanna coinage from the Mexico City mint, sharing some new research I’ve undertaken.

augi-garcia-us-mex-award-2016dan-sedwick-award-us-mex-2016

All in all, it was a quick respite from the desk and chair. If you’re a collector of Mexican coins, you should become a member of the U.S. Mexican Numismatic Association and attend next year’s convention.

dan-sedwick-connor-falk-and-cori-downing-at-us-mex-2016

 

Gallery

Sedwick Treasure, World and US Coin Auction #20 Preview

7 Sep

christmas-packages

While all of us at Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC, are diligently working on making our November Treasure World & US Coin Auction #20 the BEST ever, I thought I would pause to tell you about some of the cool stuff we will have for you to bid on and *hopefully* buy. First off, make sure your Christmas wish list is empty because there are lots and lots of goodies you’ll want! I’m already making my list.

In the upcoming auction, we have a Maravillas Research Collection of countermarked Potosi cobs. Here’s a refresher about the Maravillas from our website (abridged):

Maravillas, sunk in 1656 off Grand Bahama Island

shipwreck

As the almiranta (“admiral’s ship,” or rear guard) of the homebound Spanish fleet in January of 1656, the Nuestra Señora de las Maravillas was officially filled with over five million pesos of treasure (and probably much more in contraband, as was usually the case). That treasure included much of the silver salvaged from the South Seas Fleet’s Capitana of 1654 that wrecked on Chanduy Reef off Ecuador. The ill-fated treasure sank once again when the Maravillas unexpectedly ran into shallow water and was subsequently rammed by one of the other ships of its fleet, forcing the captain to try to ground the Maravillas on a nearby reef on Little Bahama Bank off Grand Bahama Island. In the ensuing chaos, exacerbated by strong winds, most of the 650 people on board the ship died in the night, and the wreckage scattered. Spanish salvagers soon recovered almost half a million pesos of treasure quickly, followed by more recoveries over the next several decades, yet with over half of the official cargo still unfound. The first re-discovery of the Maravillas in the 20th century was by Robert Marx and his company Seafinders in 1972. The second big salvage effort on the Maravillas was by Herbert Humphreys and his company Marex in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The wreck area is still being searched today, but officially the Bahamian government has not granted any leases on the site since the early 1990s.

roberto_mastalir

Roberto Mastalir Divisek

 

In addition to the above Potosi shipwreck cobs, we are honored to present a collection of “Transitional” 1652 Potosi 8 reales cobs put together and written about extensively by Robert Mastalir. All of his coins in the upcoming auction are featured (photographed) in his book The Great Transition at the Potosi Mint, 1649-1653, the 1652 Transitional 8 Reales, which is out of print already, but we plan to re-print it for the auction soon.

 

 

Unfortunately, sometimes collections come to us after the death of the collector, and that’s the case for the Charles Eidel collection of shipwreck coins and ancient Greek and Roman coins. Charlie was a genial retired NYC policeman whose appetite for coins was wide ranging. His meticulous record keeping and coin descriptions reflect his love for the hobby. It’s now time for him to posthumously pass along his gems for the next generation of collectors.

Near and dear to my heart is our major offering of Charles and Joanna coinage (both Early and Late Series) in this auction. We have a smattering of coins from several different sources which complement each other very well and will give you a lot of opportunities to enrich your collection…or start one! While we generally feature 4 reales from shipwrecks, this time we will have a large selection of the very hard-to-find smaller denominations. We will even have an early series Assayer R 1 real. And when’s the last time you saw Assayer S in any denomination? We’ve got a 2 reales for sale!

That’s it for now, but it should help you decide on what you’d like to see under the Christmas tree this year (or before)! Happy bidding.

bidders-at-fudraising-auction

%d bloggers like this: